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Jan RothuizenSoft Maps, hand-drawings, Amsterdam

"De gewoonte heeft als eigenschap dat ze dingen onzichtbaar maakt. Sommige mensen gaan daarom op vakantie. Ze reizen niet alleen om weg te zijn, maar ook om hun eigen leefomgeving weer met een nieuwe blik te kunnen zien. Een andere manier om je leefomgeving opnieuw te beleven is door vast te leggen wat je weet en ziet. Loop eens in gedachten, met je ogen dicht, een route die je dagelijks aflegt. Je zult versteld staan hoeveel informatie er in je opgeslagen zit."
 
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Jan Rothuizen

Philippe HalsmanDali Atomicus, 1948, gelatin silver print, 25.8 x 33.3 cm

Salvador Dalí, Leda Atomica, 1949, oil on canvas, 61.1 cm × 45.3 cm, Dalí Theatre and Museum, Figueres 

"Six hours and twenty-eight throws later, the result satisfied my striving for perfection. (…) My assistants and I were wet, dirty, and near complete exhaustion—only the cats still looked like new".
 
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Philippe Halsman

Via Artmastered
Sassoferrato, The Virgin in Prayer, 1640-50, oil on canvas, 73 x 57.7 cm, The National Gallery, London.

Via Artmastered

SassoferratoThe Virgin in Prayer, 1640-50, oil on canvas, 73 x 57.7 cm, The National Gallery, London.

René Magritte, Le Chant de l’Orage (Song of the Storm), 1937, oil on canvas, 65 x 54cm, Menil Collection, Houston

René Magritte, Le Chant de l’Orage (Song of the Storm), 1937, oil on canvas, 65 x 54cm, Menil Collection, Houston

ek wil nie meer as

’n melodie wees nie

laat my sing

straal

beweeg

in ’n brose stilte

agterbly

gaan stort

drink

met vriende praat

slaap

wakker word

die kinders sien


by Herman van Veen, Ek Wil Nie, Uit: In Vogelvlucht, 2002

Oeuffice, Kapital, Italian Marble and Stone Edition, 2014

Jan de Jong, woonhuis met kantoor, Schaijk 1962-67

Photos (c) Kim Zwarts

Bas PrincenPetra, 2011
Bas Princen,
 Pillar Petra, 2011
Anne Holtrop, Batara model, 2012
Bas PrincenBatara, 2012
Anne Holtrop, the making of Batara (Four Walls), Wageningen 2013
Anne Holtrop, Batara (Four Walls), Wageningen 2013

Architecture is predominantly a construction, an assemblage of materials. The opposite of constructing is perhaps the appropriation of found space, a natural cavity to give shelter. In between these two opposites many variations can be found. 

In the 19th century Petra was rediscovered by a Swiss traveler. It must have been amazing to dig the sand away and gradually unearth the grave tombs and temples that were hewn out of the mountains. Somehow redoing what the Nabataeans did so long ago, making space by taking away material, either sand or stone. 

The wind and the sand did not leave the temples and tombs untouched and faded away the looser stone parts. When walking there you see changing combinations of natural shapes, rocks and stone, sharply cut out spaces, openings hewn out of it. As if it wants to show us all the different possibilities on how the two can coexist.

By casting pigmented plaster directly in sand, I made form by first taking away the sand. This work relate to my earlier inkblot drawings, both are unrestricted in their shape, however the casts are more ambiguous with their double-faced appearance. The cast ‘walls’ are cut, with occasional openings made and loosely arranged as if a modernist house. With photographs of Bas placed alongside.

- Anne Holtrop

ALFREDO PIRRI, Passi, 2011, broken mirror tiles, Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome.

Giorgio de Chirico, La Torre del Silenzio (Tower of Silence), 1937, oil on canvas, 33 x 38 cm, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome

”..an aware man who feels the legacy of centuries, who sees clearly into the past, into the present and into himself.” - Giorgio de Chirico on the modern artist

Giorgio de Chirico, La Torre del Silenzio (Tower of Silence)1937, oil on canvas, 33 x 38 cm, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome

”..an aware man who feels the legacy of centuries, who sees clearly into the past, into the present and into himself.”
 
- Giorgio de Chirico on the modern artist

Gaetano Cellini, Vinta, 1908

Gaetano Cellini, Vinta, 1908

The house of Peter Swinnen (51N4E), Brussels

Living in a house involves extracting the maximum possible from a limited space. The decision to live here was carefully thought out: the location and the view are for me worth more tan a garden or my own roof. Living in a compact space, with an intelligent ecological footprint that is as small as possible, gives rise to a perfect quality of life. This always has to come first. The apartment building dates from Expo 58 and it perfectly reflects the spirit of the time - a solid faith in quality of life that is perhaps a little naive, but also compelling. In addition to the appartments, the building offers various other elements that add to one’s comfort, including a solarium (a communal roof terrace with a panoramic view) and a sort of small hotel on the ground floor reserved for the occupants’ guests. This residential building is a good example of intelligent architecture, since the design offers various extra possibilities. As a result, this is an extremely contemporary way of living. But there is still room for improvement: we are planning for example to create a green roof next to the solarium to use the space more effectively and act as an energy buffer. This is a building that can evolve with its inhabitants - and there aren’t many buildings like that.

Peter Swinnen (51N4E)

Own scans from here

The house of Nicolas Firket in a previous post

Edward Hopper, Rooms By The Sea, 1951, oil on canvas, 74.3 x 101.6 cm, Yale University Art Gallery

As a mature artist, Edward Hopper spent most of his summers on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. There, he designed and built a sunny, secluded studio at Truro, on a bluff overlooking the ocean. The view in ‘Rooms by the Sea’ resembles what Hopper would have seen out the back door of his studio. But the description that he gave this painting in his notebook—-“The Jumping Off Place”—-suggests that the image is more a metaphor of solitude and introspection than a depiction of the actual place. Like Hopper’s most arresting images, this scene seems to be realistic, abstract, and surrealistic all at once. - Yale University Art Gallery

Edward Hopper, Rooms By The Sea, 1951, oil on canvas, 74.3 x 101.6 cm, Yale University Art Gallery

As a mature artist, Edward Hopper spent most of his summers on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. There, he designed and built a sunny, secluded studio at Truro, on a bluff overlooking the ocean. The view in ‘Rooms by the Sea’ resembles what Hopper would have seen out the back door of his studio. But the description that he gave this painting in his notebook—-“The Jumping Off Place”—-suggests that the image is more a metaphor of solitude and introspection than a depiction of the actual place. Like Hopper’s most arresting images, this scene seems to be realistic, abstract, and surrealistic all at once.
 
- Yale University Art Gallery

Anni Albers, Play of Squares, 1955

Anni Albers, Play of Squares, 1955

Louise Nevelson, Fondazione Roma, Palazzo Sciarra Roma 2013

"Art is everywhere, except it has to pass through a creative mind."

Louise Nevelson

The practice of assemblage, brought to linguistic quality by Duchamp, Picasso, Schwitters and other sculptors, became for Lousie Nevelson the characteristic form of expression. Her sculptures, in fact, are made ​​out of recycled objects to which she has given a new “spiritual” life. She created works with the use of different materials such as aluminium and plexiglass, although her favorite material is without a doubt wood. Since the fifties, she also introduced in her works the symbolic function of the monochrome going from matte black (years ‘55-‘59) to white (years ‘59-‘60), gold (‘61-’60s) and making the boundaries between sculpture, collage and relief blur.